Training for a 10k race in the gym

Share:
  • Share Twitter
  • Share facebook
  • Share Linkedin
  • Share by email

Preparing for a 10k in the gym

Runners will tell you that the only place to really train for a 10k or half marathon is by running – outdoors. These are the hardy types you see in all weathers, braving snow, sleet, rain, wind and scorching sun to pound out the miles.

Taking a different route

Well, I’m here to offer you another way. Yes, of course you will need to run outside for the actual event, but I am a keen advocate of making training as comfortable as possible, and sometimes that means doing the race preparations largely inside, in the dry and warm.

And Kelsey Kerridge Outlooks Gym has everything you need to train for a 10k. The treadmill offers the means to build up the mileage, and with the top-of-the-range console you are always aware of your speed, distance, heart-rate, incline and anything else you need to know.

For recovery days, when you want to loosen limbs but do not want to venture back onto the treadmill, there are bikes, rowers and steppers. A nice long bike ride is a great way to get rid of lactic acid built up during a hard running session, while the rowing machines work a whole different set of muscles, giving your calves and the soles of your feet a well-earned break.

All over fitness for a great 10k

It is common knowledge that runners cannot exist on running alone, they need some strength and conditioning work to make sure that they avoid injuries. The free weights, machines and functional fitness area are all perfect for helping you tone and stretch muscles, particularly your core and the muscles around your hips and knees.

 

 

 

 

 

So, with a number of respectable 10k and half marathons under my belt, here is my four week guide to training for a race. This is a training programme that assumes the user had done some running; complete beginners see next week’s blog.

Week One and Week Three:

Day 1:

On treadmill:

1. 3k warm-up, running at half your normal race pace. (So if you run 4min kilometres, jog at 8min kilometre pace.

2. Next do 3 x 1k at 75 per cent effort. Take a 1 minute walk between each kilometre. Follow this with a five minute gentle jog.

3. Next do 3 x 500 metres at race pace. Take a 1 minute walk between each kilometre. Follow this with a five minute gentle jog.

4. Do 2 x 1k at race pace.

5. Warm down and stretch.

Day 2:

On bike and in weights room:

Cycle for 35 minutes, varying the pace to raise your heart rate into aerobic training zone for 20 minutes.
Work on your hamstrings, quads and calves in the free weights area. Spend 5-7 minutes on each major muscle group. Ask one of the Kelsey Kerridge staff if you are unsure of best practice.
Cycle for 25 minutes, again varying the pace to raise your heart rate into the aerobic training zone for 15 minutes.
Work on your core via a range of sit-ups, planks, crunches and back-raisers. This should take about 15 minutes.

Day 3:

On treadmill:

Warm up with a 5 minute jog.
Run as fast as you can for 1 minute, followed by 1 minute walk. Follow with 2, 3, 4, 5 minute runs where you go as fast as you can maintain. Take a 1 minute walking break between each rep.
Now work down the order, start with 5 minutes, then repeat for 4,3,2, and 1. Again, take a minute between each rep to recover with a walk.

In the weights section, work on your upper body. Focus on triceps, biceps, upper back and chest, spending 5-7 minutes on each major muscle group.

Week Two and Four:

Day 1.

On treadmill:

Warm up with 5 minute jog.
Run at steady pace for 20 minutes (this should be the pace at which you would run the whole 10k).
Put the treadmill on a 5 per cent incline and do 5 x 400 metres as fast as you can, with a minutes recovery between each rep.
Lower the incline and run at race pace for 10 minutes.
Go on the bike for a steady 20 minute cycling recovery.

Day 2:

In the functional fitness area, do a 10-piece circuit, with 3 x 45 repetitions on each piece of equipment. Circuit can comprise: burpees, push-ups, ropes – single arm and double arm – plyometric box, Bulgarian bags, kettlebells, pull-ups, squats, crunches/sit-ups.

Day 3.

Warm up with 5 minute jog
Run 1k at race speed. Walk for 1 minute.
Run 800 metres at race speed, with a sprint for the last 100 metres. Walk for 1 minute.
Run 600 metres at race speed, with a sprint for last 200 metres. Walk for 1 minute.
Run 400 metres as fast as you can. Walk for 1 minute.
Run 200 metres as fast as you can. Walk for 1 minute.
Run at steady pace 75 per cent) for 10 minutes.

After the sessions, ensure you cool down properly and do plenty of stretching. During the week, add some Yoga moves and DO remember to take advantage of the Kelsey Kerridge Sauna – getting some heat and relaxation into the tired limbs will speed up your recovery from one session to the next.